YU - Cenovnik automobila 27.03.1975

YU - Cenovnik automobila 27.03.1975

Postod BgdChb » Sre Okt 09, 2013 10:00 pm

Slika

Slika

Slika
Korisnikov avatar
BgdChb
 
Postovi: 688
Pridružio se: Pon Okt 10, 2011 2:08 pm
Oldtajmer: Ford Capri Mk1 1600

Re: YU - Cenovnik automobila 27.03.1975

Postod darius555 » Sre Apr 22, 2015 11:05 am

I see western made cars are priced in foreign currency. Why they are not priced in Dinars?
Korisnikov avatar
darius555
 
Postovi: 9
Pridružio se: Sre Apr 22, 2015 11:03 am
Oldtajmer: Audi A3 8V

Re: YU - Cenovnik automobila 27.03.1975

Postod darius555 » Sre Apr 22, 2015 11:12 am

By the way

As I know in YUG was capability to own west made cars ,for example in USSR there were no one west made car, except in Moscow where foreign embassies owned them or special police units had fast MB and BMW. So what was price difference for example between LADA,VW Golf TAS and MB W123 in late 70s. Was it possible to buy MB in local dealer. In czech republic west made cars was available only in Tuzex shops (trading in hard currency), for example Ford Sierra in 1984 was priced 10x more than brand new LADA 1500
Korisnikov avatar
darius555
 
Postovi: 9
Pridružio se: Sre Apr 22, 2015 11:03 am
Oldtajmer: Audi A3 8V

Re: YU - Cenovnik automobila 27.03.1975

Postod Superbird » Sre Apr 22, 2015 11:44 am

The prices for the imported cars are listed in both dinars and currency of the country of origin, at least on the scanned price list above.

As far as I know, in Serbia we always used the foreign currency to list prices for cars, apartments and other items of greater value. Deutsche Mark was used before, and now all prices for cars are listed in Euro. Perhaps during communism dinar was used exclusively, but that's before my time :)
I'll face it with a grin, I'm never giving in
Korisnikov avatar
Superbird
Site Admin
 
Postovi: 931
Pridružio se: Uto Apr 07, 2009 1:47 pm
Lokacija: ŠABAC
Oldtajmer: Audi 100 Typ 43

Re: YU - Cenovnik automobila 27.03.1975

Postod darius555 » Čet Apr 23, 2015 6:45 am

I don't think that prices were listed to pay in DM or Dinars. In my opininio car price is listed in DM and duty in dinars, pay attention to LADA 2103 and Audi 100, if the prices were as you said , they cost the same

By the way - was it possible to exchange legally dinars into hard currency like $ or DM in YUG times?
Korisnikov avatar
darius555
 
Postovi: 9
Pridružio se: Sre Apr 22, 2015 11:03 am
Oldtajmer: Audi A3 8V

Re: YU - Cenovnik automobila 27.03.1975

Postod The Punisher » Pet Apr 24, 2015 7:56 am

My parents bought Ford Taunus 1.3 for 6000 german Marks back in 1975. like it was written on price list, and later when car came into Yugoslavia, customs and tax were paid in dinars. Price in german Marks is pure factory price, price that went directly to Ford factory and because we could not buy foreign currency freely at that time, there were not too much foreign cars in Yugoslavia at that time. My parents borrowed german Marks from our cousin who worked in Germany at that time to buy Ford. It is interesting that customs and tax were 95 % of factory price in 1975. Back in those days that was the way to control cash flow of foreign currency in Yugoslavia and it was very successful.

Here is my bill from 1975.:

Slika
Korisnikov avatar
The Punisher
 
Postovi: 51
Pridružio se: Sre Sep 02, 2009 8:35 pm
Lokacija: Beograd
Oldtajmer: Ford Taunus TC1

Re: YU - Cenovnik automobila 27.03.1975

Postod darius555 » Pet Apr 24, 2015 11:59 am

Maybe somebody remember when it became possible to exchange legally foreign currency in banks. In Lithuania it was in fall of 1991, and than became clear that our sallaries are 50DM. During soviet times hard currency was forbiden to handle by law. For big amounts you could get death penalty. Only in 1985 when Gorbachiov came there were allowed to handle freely no more 100$.

About cars: West made cars were not available at all, Warsaw pact made cars were not available too,except some trucks in late 80s. From Warsaw bloc we had only JAWA motorbyces. Sallary was about 150 - 200RUB for enginer or doctor. Brand new LADA 1500 in 1980 was priced as 7500RUB, but this price was valid only if buying legally. You should wait in queue for 7 years to get one, but if you wanted to pick up car quickly you should pay 16 000RUB in black market. Top edge car in until independence was Volga GAZ 24 or later model 3102. Cost was about 50 000RUB in black market. Mainstay of cars were Zaparozec and Moskvitch. In late 80s Lada Samara started to appear, which became symbol of status too like 3102 in those times. Shop shelves were almost empty at all in late 80s. Everything came from undershelves in shops, for three times greater price. For example car spare parts or some rare alchohol.

About rest: Borders were closed at all, even to Warsaw pact countries. To travel to East Germany we should get permission, to travel to West countries or YUG was mission impossible.Borders to east bloc opened in 1988, but still some papers were needed to travel, not like to today it's enough to have only valid passport.



By the way in YUG was available any other western stuff in shops, like Hi-Fi or Sony TV sets?
Korisnikov avatar
darius555
 
Postovi: 9
Pridružio se: Sre Apr 22, 2015 11:03 am
Oldtajmer: Audi A3 8V

Re: YU - Cenovnik automobila 27.03.1975

Postod darius555 » Pet Apr 24, 2015 12:05 pm

By the way question:

Was it possible to earn for working class man in YUG for Mercedes W123 in 80s for example, not new, but 3-4 year old.

What sallaries had yours workers? It is intresting to compare to USSR , during car price prism.

As I understood one way to get west made car was only to buy currency from black market or of somebody who worked in West Germany?

VW TAS and SIMOS citroen was for dinars? What price was for Golf I and for example Trabant or Wartburg?
Korisnikov avatar
darius555
 
Postovi: 9
Pridružio se: Sre Apr 22, 2015 11:03 am
Oldtajmer: Audi A3 8V

Re: YU - Cenovnik automobila 27.03.1975

Postod The Punisher » Sub Apr 25, 2015 5:13 pm

From the price list from post one all cars with price only in dinars could have been bought only with dinars, models with double prices were foreign currency +dinars for customs and taxes.

I am uploading car Magazine from 1968. with the price list of used cars, and also a car Magazine from 1989. with an interesting text about how many salaries an average Yugoslav need to buy certain car model.

Slika
Slika

Slika
Slika
Korisnikov avatar
The Punisher
 
Postovi: 51
Pridružio se: Sre Sep 02, 2009 8:35 pm
Lokacija: Beograd
Oldtajmer: Ford Taunus TC1

Re: YU - Cenovnik automobila 27.03.1975

Postod darius555 » Sre Apr 29, 2015 7:01 am

Amazing 560SEC for average Yugoslavian, by the way photo is W124, must be W126. Was it possible to spot cars like W126 560SEC during 80s in YUG with local license plates?


By the way : Was in YUG shops any wester stuff available like hi-fi components or ...
Korisnikov avatar
darius555
 
Postovi: 9
Pridružio se: Sre Apr 22, 2015 11:03 am
Oldtajmer: Audi A3 8V

Re: YU - Cenovnik automobila 27.03.1975

Postod djape1977 » Sre Apr 29, 2015 8:37 am

it was very complicated...
yugoslavia was officially communist ruled country, but private enterprise was allowed. trading in foreign currency was forbiden but anybody could get it. there were western cars available, hi-fi's, computers, jeans, coca cola...
for example, ladas were sold in yugoslavia tru domestic company that also made cars, zastava. all ladas sold in yugoslavia were sold as domestic cars, without import duties and they wore aluminium plate marking them as "zastava 1200" - 2101, "zastava 1500SL" - 2103 etc.
that was done as a kind of "favour" to USSR, to make their cars more competitive in yugoslavian market.
same was also done for some FIAT models, 132 for example, while 131(mirafiori) was treated as import, and there were large import taxes. therefore, 131 was twice as expensive as lada although they were cars of same size and should have been priced simmilar.

strange times... when i was a kid, my parents had a new FSO polski 125, latest SONY TRINITRON TV, my grandad had bought new lada 2101, we had a home computer in 1982, i grew up playing space invaders at the same time western kids did, but goverment was buying new MIGs from USSR and nuclear power plant from WESTINGHOUSE, USA
nemoj na silu, uzmi veci cekic
j***** auto bez kardana
Korisnikov avatar
djape1977
 
Postovi: 4253
Pridružio se: Sub Okt 24, 2009 3:20 pm
Lokacija: Zemun
Oldtajmer: fiati: 124 sport, 131 mirafiori, 131 racing, 132 2000, ritmo 105, ritmo 130 abarth
lada: 2103 i 2104

Re: YU - Cenovnik automobila 27.03.1975

Postod darius555 » Sre Apr 29, 2015 11:21 am

In previous post was journal snapshot when decleared how much sallaries is needed to buy a certain car model.But it was 1989 local currency was devaluated, so it is answer why W126 was so expensive. But in real life for example in late 70s, how long it was needed to save for LADA or for Golf TAS? What sort of people drove W123 or W116.

Could any statistic worker to buy DM in black market and then grab western made car? Would he/she be caught by police or simply workers sallary was to small to make deals like this

About Sony - was they available in black market or in official shops?

In USSR all west made electronics was available only in black market. For example in mid 80s VHS recorder/player costed 4000 - 6000RUB, when average sallary was 150-200RUB. VHS was symbol of status back in these times. Blank SONY MC casette costed 15RUB in black market.

To get car was two ways :
* Wait in queue for approx 7 years to buy LADA 2103 for 7500RUB in case of success, in case of fault you would got permission to Moskvitch or ZAZ,
* To buy in not prooper way for 16 000RUB, or second hand for 12 000RUB. My grand bought used ZAZ 966 in 1972 for 7000RUB, when "official" price for LADA 2101 was 5500RUB.

Some people made big money getting cars for "queue" price and selling for 2x or 3x
Korisnikov avatar
darius555
 
Postovi: 9
Pridružio se: Sre Apr 22, 2015 11:03 am
Oldtajmer: Audi A3 8V

Re: YU - Cenovnik automobila 27.03.1975

Postod djape1977 » Sre Apr 29, 2015 4:31 pm

browse this topic to see what cars were on the streets trough decades
viewtopic.php?f=36&t=117&start=25


up to early 80's you could ocassionally see a w116, cadillac, or simmilar expensive cars on the streets, but 99% of those were goverment owned. maybe there were a few in private hands, but highly unlikely. financially they were WAY out of reach of anybody who earned their living, even famous actors, football players, singers couldn't afford them. since there was no organized crime to speak off (secret police did their job very well) nobody could really afford to buy such a car.
even if you somehow managed to earn/save/steal/smuggle enough money, you wouldn't want to buy a mercedes or anything simmilarly priced since that would be poking the eye of state and least that would happen is that you'd get invitation from police for "informative conversation". later, tax revenue service would skin you alive.

only people who did have such cars were those who lived and worked abroad and had earned their money outside yugoslavia. even then, wise ones tryed not to poke the eye...

here you can see a mercedes cabriolet with police plates M
Slika

later, when those cars were 10+yrs old, they were "written off" and sold to private hands in auctions. in theory, anybody could buy ex-goverment owned cars in auctions, but in practice, very limited circle of people had acess to those auctions. high ranking goverment officials, their children, close relatives...
nemoj na silu, uzmi veci cekic
j***** auto bez kardana
Korisnikov avatar
djape1977
 
Postovi: 4253
Pridružio se: Sub Okt 24, 2009 3:20 pm
Lokacija: Zemun
Oldtajmer: fiati: 124 sport, 131 mirafiori, 131 racing, 132 2000, ritmo 105, ritmo 130 abarth
lada: 2103 i 2104

Re: YU - Cenovnik automobila 27.03.1975

Postod djape1977 » Sre Apr 29, 2015 4:42 pm

darius555 je napisao:Could any statistic worker to buy DM in black market and then grab western made car? Would he/she be caught by police or simply workers sallary was to small to make deals like this


yes they could buy foreign currency legally. some people had big enough pay for such deals. if you wanted to buy a foreign car, you'd go and buy foreign currency and then buy a car for that ammount. of course, you needed to have a proof of origin for money

my grandfather was a civilian pilot, flying domestic and foreign flights. his salary was big enough to buy new cars for cash. he even got partially paid in foreign currency. for example, in 70's, when he flew to USA, they would go from Belgrade to New York on monday, stay there untill friday and then fly back. crew got paid in US dollars for time they spent abroad in order to have money to cover their expenses there. he pretty much never spent all of it, so he had a legal source of foreign currency. i know he had bought a new peugeot 204 or something like that in late 60's. my mom crashed it in 1972, so he went and bought a new lada 2101 for cash because he needed a car and lada was only car available at the moment without waiting list. i can't tell you exactly, but i guess that lada was something between 6-10 monthly salaries for him.

i know couple university professors that have bought what were back then very expensive fiats 132 new, for a price of aprox. 3 ladas.
nemoj na silu, uzmi veci cekic
j***** auto bez kardana
Korisnikov avatar
djape1977
 
Postovi: 4253
Pridružio se: Sub Okt 24, 2009 3:20 pm
Lokacija: Zemun
Oldtajmer: fiati: 124 sport, 131 mirafiori, 131 racing, 132 2000, ritmo 105, ritmo 130 abarth
lada: 2103 i 2104

Re: YU - Cenovnik automobila 27.03.1975

Postod djape1977 » Sre Apr 29, 2015 5:50 pm

darius555 je napisao:About Sony - was they available in black market or in official shops?

In USSR all west made electronics was available only in black market. For example in mid 80s VHS recorder/player costed 4000 - 6000RUB, when average sallary was 150-200RUB. VHS was symbol of status back in these times. Blank SONY MC casette costed 15RUB in black market.

up untill mid 80's - black market and grey market. there was a kind of chop called "commision shop" every town had one, big cities had several. theoretically, foreign goods siezed by customs. not quite so in practice. goods were expensive, but if you wanted original levis 501 - you got it there.

sony was expensive, but my parents had resonably well paid jobs so they could afford it in 1982. dad was a factory engeneer, mum was a national bank clerk. dad bought it on black market, from a sailor that worked on one of goverment owned trading ships, for a price of 1000$ us, which was exactly 1/7 the price of new lada or FSO 125
nemoj na silu, uzmi veci cekic
j***** auto bez kardana
Korisnikov avatar
djape1977
 
Postovi: 4253
Pridružio se: Sub Okt 24, 2009 3:20 pm
Lokacija: Zemun
Oldtajmer: fiati: 124 sport, 131 mirafiori, 131 racing, 132 2000, ritmo 105, ritmo 130 abarth
lada: 2103 i 2104

Re: YU - Cenovnik automobila 27.03.1975

Postod djape1977 » Sre Apr 29, 2015 6:04 pm

darius555 je napisao:To get car was two ways :
* Wait in queue for approx 7 years to buy LADA 2103 for 7500RUB in case of success, in case of fault you would got permission to Moskvitch or ZAZ,
* To buy in not prooper way for 16 000RUB, or second hand for 12 000RUB. My grand bought used ZAZ 966 in 1972 for 7000RUB, when "official" price for LADA 2101 was 5500RUB.

Some people made big money getting cars for "queue" price and selling for 2x or 3x

interestingly enough, for some cars at some times there was a waiting list, for others not.
as i said, my grandfather bought a brand new lada 2101 in official dealership for cash and drove it home the same day in 1972, and my father bought a new fso 125 in 1977 for 7000$ us on black market, from a pensioner ex army colonel, who could somehow buy it without waiting list. go figure!
nemoj na silu, uzmi veci cekic
j***** auto bez kardana
Korisnikov avatar
djape1977
 
Postovi: 4253
Pridružio se: Sub Okt 24, 2009 3:20 pm
Lokacija: Zemun
Oldtajmer: fiati: 124 sport, 131 mirafiori, 131 racing, 132 2000, ritmo 105, ritmo 130 abarth
lada: 2103 i 2104

Re: YU - Cenovnik automobila 27.03.1975

Postod darius555 » Čet Apr 30, 2015 10:49 am

djape1977 je napisao:
darius555 je napisao:Could any statistic worker to buy DM in black market and then grab western made car? Would he/she be caught by police or simply workers sallary was to small to make deals like this


yes they could buy foreign currency legally. some people had big enough pay for such deals. if you wanted to buy a foreign car, you'd go and buy foreign currency and then buy a car for that ammount. of course, you needed to have a proof of origin for money

my grandfather was a civilian pilot, flying domestic and foreign flights. his salary was big enough to buy new cars for cash. he even got partially paid in foreign currency. for example, in 70's, when he flew to USA, they would go from Belgrade to New York on monday, stay there untill friday and then fly back. crew got paid in US dollars for time they spent abroad in order to have money to cover their expenses there. he pretty much never spent all of it, so he had a legal source of foreign currency. i know he had bought a new peugeot 204 or something like that in late 60's. my mom crashed it in 1972, so he went and bought a new lada 2101 for cash because he needed a car and lada was only car available at the moment without waiting list. i can't tell you exactly, but i guess that lada was something between 6-10 monthly salaries for him.

i know couple university professors that have bought what were back then very expensive fiats 132 new, for a price of aprox. 3 ladas.



So as I unterstood it was allowed to came to bank and exchange unlimited amount of dinars to USD or DM? As I know it was impossible or I'm not right?

By the way: Was it usable pratice to go to West Germany and buy something second hand?
Korisnikov avatar
darius555
 
Postovi: 9
Pridružio se: Sre Apr 22, 2015 11:03 am
Oldtajmer: Audi A3 8V

Re: YU - Cenovnik automobila 27.03.1975

Postod djape1977 » Pet Maj 01, 2015 12:50 am

perhaps there was a legal limit how much foreign currency you could buy, but as long as you had a proof of origin of your local currency you were fine. buying 10-15000 dollars or german marks was definately allowed, and nobody would need more in one go anyhow.
i remember as a kid my parents had both dinar(local) savings accounts and foreign curency savings accounts in banks. i don't know when exactly this became legal, but in 80's it was widely practiced. thinking about it, it must have been legal in the early 70's as well, remember the lada 2101 story...

yes it was common to import second hand goods from other countries. some small stuff was allowed to go tru the customs without dues, but TV's, VCRs, cars, fur coats etc were very expensive to import, often 200% duty. often those were actually new goods, but as soon as they were out of the box they were oficcially "used". if you came to a border in a car returning from "the west" with a TV, VCR, stereo and a fur coat, you would be charged customs duty. if you had 3 VCRs, they would simply explain to you that importing more than one in one go was considered commercial import and you should start export import company. that lead to funny situations since it was allowed to cross a border as many times as you wanted, so you would literaly leave your companion on one side while you took VCR to other side, paid customs duty, than returned for the next and so on... as long as customs officers stamped your passport you were fine. of course, if they noticed you were crossing the border often and importing stuff, they would inform tax revenue service. this naturally led to smuggling. customs officers were notorious for taking bribes to look the other way.

there were always "shortages" of something in yugoslavia, or some items were unresonably expensive.
one year it was cofee, so everybody brought it from greece comiing back from vacation.
next year leather jackets would come in fashion so everybody would go to turkey to get few lot cheaper than locally
then price of gold jewelry in romania would go down so people were crossing borders wit half a kilo of gold chains around their necks :wtf:
those who lived near the borders would cross over even for weekly supplies. detergents, butter, whatever...

technically and legally, you were allowed to bring in what was on your person without customs duty, so you could ocassionally see someone on the border in august wearing a fur coat waiting in line to cross :lol:
nemoj na silu, uzmi veci cekic
j***** auto bez kardana
Korisnikov avatar
djape1977
 
Postovi: 4253
Pridružio se: Sub Okt 24, 2009 3:20 pm
Lokacija: Zemun
Oldtajmer: fiati: 124 sport, 131 mirafiori, 131 racing, 132 2000, ritmo 105, ritmo 130 abarth
lada: 2103 i 2104

Re: YU - Cenovnik automobila 27.03.1975

Postod djape1977 » Pet Maj 01, 2015 1:10 am

cars were diferent story altogether. import of used cars was always limited.
up untill colapse of yugoslavia in 90's, there was no legal way for average citizen to import a used car.

at some times goverment would allow import of car shells. if you legally owned a foreign made car, you could import a bare shell for it as a spare part. new or used. naturally, you would go out to a car marketplace and buy a rotten beaten up mercedes, opel, fiat and then go and buy the exact same car abroad in good condition, go to customs, pay your bribes, and import a whole car. then, couple months later they would again change the law and forbid such practice. this was done on and off many times over the years. it was a kind of "relief valve". or maybe it was a 13th salary for customs officers?

then, if you worked abroad for over a year (2, 5... law was changed several times over the years) you could legally import your car when you came back into country. catch was that you weren't allowed to sell it in next 3 years. naturally, there was a way around this too. you would buy the car without legally transfering ownership. however, it was always very limited quantity of cars

then, there was good old fashioned smuggling. buy a crashed car, rotten, broken down. get someone with a foreign working licence or passport to drive a car for you into yugoslavia. swap over chasis number. VIOLA!
of course, this is a felony, but it was and still is common practice. so much so that you can still find ads with people selling just papers for a car
nemoj na silu, uzmi veci cekic
j***** auto bez kardana
Korisnikov avatar
djape1977
 
Postovi: 4253
Pridružio se: Sub Okt 24, 2009 3:20 pm
Lokacija: Zemun
Oldtajmer: fiati: 124 sport, 131 mirafiori, 131 racing, 132 2000, ritmo 105, ritmo 130 abarth
lada: 2103 i 2104

Re: YU - Cenovnik automobila 27.03.1975

Postod dmj » Pet Jun 26, 2015 12:31 pm

Two main differences between Yugoslavia and Eastern Bloc countries haven't been mentioned, and both were big sources of the foreign currencies.
Since early 1960's Yugoslavia had agreement with Western countries, most notably West Germany, to allow people from here to work abroad. Literally hundreds of thousands people went to the Western coutries, earned hard currencies there and then brought it completely legally into Yugoslavia. Either through sending it to their relatives by post as an aid or when visiting. Also, if they spent some time (IIRC it was 3 years) abroad they could legally import a car upon returning home.
Other main source was tourism - borders were open and strangers were spending the hard currencies, especially at the coastline and islands. Thus a lot of the people could get hard currencies relatively legally, some of them huge amounts.
Foreign cars were present, with some differences from region to region. As Slovenia and Croatia were generally more developed and richer, Western cars (or even Far Eastern ones) were more common. Probably the cultural tradition plays a part. Russian cars were much more prominent in Serbia than in Croatia, for instance. I'd say it might also have roots in Orthodox vs. Catholic approach, at least partially. Growing up in Zagreb in 1980's, BMW or Peugeot cars comfortably outnumbered Moskvitches and Volgas on the streets. But even within Croatia, coming from Zagreb or coastline to smaller inland towns, situation would be much different. Even today you can easily spot the differences in terms of popularity of certain types of cars when you travel from country to country, from region to region, within former Yugoslavia.
Korisnikov avatar
dmj
 
Postovi: 219
Pridružio se: Sub Jan 29, 2011 6:42 pm
Oldtajmer: Nekoliko tisuća malih modela

Re: YU - Cenovnik automobila 27.03.1975

Postod darius555 » Pet Jul 10, 2015 10:54 am

Was available any other western made goods in ordinary shops? For example minor thing as blank MC Tapes (BASF,TDK) or perfume?

As I understood there was dealers of west made cars in YUG, if you wanted to buy new, but only you should pay in hard currency? So it's is clear why MB W126 560SEC was so expensive in 1989 - taxes is included, and there was inflation in late 80s, so currency exchange ratio was enormnous.

Was it possible in 80s to spot stars of those time like - Ford Sierra, Audi 80 B3, MB 190E or famous BMW 3 E30?

These were very famous in Lithuania after 1991. All Lithuanians started to sell its LADAs for Russians. Russians came and paid 3000-4000$ for Lada Samara, Sierra was priced like you got for LADA or less for early 80s models, MB 190E in 1995 (10 years old) was 5000$ , so all Soviet stuff fast dissapeared from our country, and our people drove VW Golf Mk2, Audi 100 C3 or similar car they could afford for amount they got from Russian for LADA. Russians didn't buy west made cars in case of high duties, they could import its native cars without any taxes only

Other like MB W124,W126 was affordable only for bad boys or politicians. I recall BMW 535 (1990) in 1995 was priced 12 000$, when salary in rural area was 100$, "good" income was 300$. In 1991 income was 30$ in four years it raised till 100$

I recall early 90s very well, owners of Moskwitch and Volgas were in deep shit. Russians didn't buy them, there was very high level of unemployment, most factories bankrupted, people couldn't get salaries for 4 months or more. Some people limited food consumption. Other side of medal was mafia working side by side with government. They could for example sell all machinery of bankrupted factory to metal scrap in Germany, so they drove even W140. Some traveled to Turkey or Poland brought here goods and sold them in market, other went to Germany to bring here cars. It was not fashionable to study in university - engineer or doctor salary was 100$, if you went to Turkey you earn 500$ for week. Now everything overturned (started in 1998) and those who dropped studies in early 90s tried later to finish.

As I know in Serbia 90s was interesting too. You have no war on Serbian land, but in case of support of rebels, you got UN sanctions? Maybe can somebody can explain life in 90s
Korisnikov avatar
darius555
 
Postovi: 9
Pridružio se: Sre Apr 22, 2015 11:03 am
Oldtajmer: Audi A3 8V

Re: YU - Cenovnik automobila 27.03.1975

Postod dmj » Pet Jul 10, 2015 3:03 pm

Blank cassettes were available, some local made and some Western or Far Eastern brands, but not all of them and only in better music shops. There was black market, especially for TDK tapes, whilst BASF was generally available. In some aspects we were quite close to West, much more than Eastern bloc countries, and music was one of these fields. People like Rolling Stones, Santana, Talking Heads, Eric Clapton, Dire Straits... had concerts in Yugoslavia and their records were regularly available. Sometimes a record would be issued several years later but in most cases during the 1980's within a few weeks after the release in USA or UK... Stil there was black market for everything, records, perfumes... as not everything was regularly available.

As for cars you mentioned, yes, they were on the streets. Not lots of them but (again, in parts of Croatia where I lived) we wouldn't really turn our heads for any of the mentioned models, they were present and regularly seen.
Korisnikov avatar
dmj
 
Postovi: 219
Pridružio se: Sub Jan 29, 2011 6:42 pm
Oldtajmer: Nekoliko tisuća malih modela


Povratak na Prospekti, brosure i katalozi

Ko je OnLine

Korisnici koji su trenutno na forumu: Nema registrovanih korisnika i 2 gostiju